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Ancient Grains for Modern Diets

June 13th, 2024

One of the latest foods in dietary news is also one of the oldest—ancient grains. What makes these old-timers so appealing to modern tastes? Let’s run down the menu!

Why Are Some Grains Called “Ancient”?

Unlike grains such as modern wheat, which have been crossbred for hundreds of years to bring out certain qualities, ancient grains are generally considered to be grains which have been cultivated in the same way and in the same form for centuries.

Not All Grains Are the Same

Grains are harvested from the seeds, or kernels, which grow on top of cereal grasses. But because they have many of the same uses, and many of the same nutrients, ancient grains also include pseudocereals, which are seeds and fruits from non-grasses. These seeds can be ground just like grains or used whole. This is an important distinction for many diet-mindful people because grains derived from pseudocereals are gluten-free.

The Health Benefits of Ancient Grains

Ancient grains are whole grains. This means that the seeds of ancient grains have their bran, germ, and endosperm intact—which means that all their nutrients, proteins, and fiber also remain intact. Refined grains like white flour and white rice have removed many of these good-for-your-body elements by removing the bran and germ, leaving only the endosperm behind.

The Dental Benefits of Ancient Grains

Of course, any food that offers better nutrition is better for your teeth and gums. But there’s an added bonus in the more complex structure of intact grains—they take more time to digest.

With foods made with refined grains, digestion starts taking place quickly—in fact, saliva starts the digestive process right in our mouths while we eat. And as these carbs break down into sugars, they provide a feast for the oral bacteria which convert that sugar into acids.

These acids, in turn, attack tooth enamel, leaving weaker spots which can grow into cavities, and irritate delicate gum tissue. What’s more, refined carbs tend to be extra sticky, lingering in the mouth, between the teeth, and on the enamel instead of being washed away by saliva.

So, Have Any Suggestions for My Shopping List?

We do! Because all ancient grains are loaded with protein and fiber, they are all going to be a rich source of these healthy essentials. And they can offer additional minerals, vitamins, and antioxidants to your diet. If you’re inspired to add a bit of history and geography to your plate, here are some ancient grains to consider:

  • Amaranth

Cultivated by the Aztecs, this gluten-free pseudocereal seed is high in manganese, magnesium, copper, phosphorus (which helps keep your enamel strong), and also provides vitamins B1 (thiamin), B6, and B9 (folic acid).

  • Barley

Grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe, barley is one of the first cultivated grains. In its whole grain form, barley offers us selenium, manganese, copper, vitamins B1 and B3 (niacin), and antioxidants. Whole barley has a very tough outer shell and takes quite a bit of cooking, so lightly pearled barley can be substituted with only a small loss of bran.

  • Buckwheat

Originating in Asia, buckwheat quickly spread to Europe and eventually made its way to early American fields. Another pseudocereal, buckwheat seed is often ground for flour, and is a good source of copper, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamins B2 (riboflavin), and B3. Not to mention, gluten-free!

  • Bulgur

Often used in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cooking, bulgur is a cracked wheat cereal grain. Bulgur adds, among other nutrients, manganese, magnesium, copper, iron, and vitamins B3 and B6 to your diet.

  • Farro

“Farro” comes from an Italian word which can refer to three different varieties of wheat, with different cooking times, textures, and flavors. These grains were first cultivated in the Middle East and the Mediterranean region thousands of years ago, and are still popular today thanks to their nutty flavor and chewy texture. Try farro for a tasty serving of magnesium, zinc, vitamin B3, and antioxidants.

  • Freekeh

Common in Middle Eastern, North African, and Mediterranean cuisine, freekeh is another form of cracked wheat. It’s harvested when the plants are young, so it has extra protein and fiber, as well as being a good source of iron.

  • Quinoa

Another pseudocereal, quinoa originated in South America. It’s gluten-free, and filled with minerals such as manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, and vitamin B9. It’s also a complete protein, which means it contains all nine of the amino acids our bodies can’t produce on their own.

  • Spelt

One of the largest wheat crops in Europe, and grown around the world, spelt’s nutty taste is an added bonus to its stores of manganese, copper, phosphorus, and vitamin B3.

  • Teff

The smallest of the ancient grains, teff is an African variety of millet, a pseudocereal full of nutrients such as manganese, copper, iron, and calcium (another mineral which is vital to dental health), as well as vitamins B1 and B6. Try brown teff for its naturally sweet flavor.

This is just a taste of the ancient grains available to you, with many others from around the world waiting to be harvested for your table. But you needn’t choose ancient grains to receive all the nutritional benefits of whole grains.

Brown rice, whole wheat products, corn, oats—all these common ingredients are easily available forms of whole grains. Check the grain aisle in your local market for some new ways to brighten your recipes, to increase your dietary protein and fiber, to add minerals and vitamins, and to provide some healthy alternatives to refined grains. Your body—and your teeth—might thank you!

What exactly is periodontal disease?

June 5th, 2024

Periodontal disease is an infection of the tissues that surround and support your teeth. Our team at Oak Grove Dentistry wants you to know that this common ailment can be fixed with little worry if treated properly.

Periodontal disease is usually identified through dental X-rays, probe depths, and visual exams. If left untreated, it can lead to tooth sensitivity, premature tooth loss, or discomfort and pain in your mouth. Some common symptoms to watch for include bleeding or swollen gums, bad breath, teeth movement, or jaw displacement.

Factors that may increase your risk of developing periodontal disease may include poor oral hygiene, smoking/chewing tobacco, genetics, stress, inadequate nutrition, pregnancy, diabetes, and some medications. Some of these causes are avoidable, but others are not.

If you have diabetes, you may be more prone to periodontal disease due to the greater difficulty in controlling blood glucose levels. Studies have shown that once periodontal disease is treated, glucose levels become more responsive to control as well. If your risk for periodontal disease is heightened by one of these factors, make sure to watch for the signs and keep up with your daily oral hygiene routine.

How can you treat this common disease that affects almost half of the population? Depending on the severity, treatment can include a medicated mouth rinse, antibiotic treatment, laser therapy, or scaling and root planing. It’s useful to recall that this condition can vary from mild to severe, which is why you should make an appointment at our Green Bay office if you notice any of the above symptoms.

 

Five Reasons for Your Bad Breath

May 29th, 2024

Bad breath, or halitosis, is probably not a matter of life or death. But it can make you feel self-conscious and have a negative impact on your life. The majority of people suffering from bad breath are dealing with oral bacterial. However, there are other causes of this embarrassing problem. Learning more can help you fight this solvable problem.

Five Causes of Embarrassingly Bad Breath

  1. Dry Mouth. A decrease in saliva flow can be caused by several things. Most often, medication or mouth breathing are the culprits. As saliva helps wash away food particles from your mouth, it prevents bad breath. Dry mouth can be dealt with by stimulating salivation.
  2. Gum Disease and Poor Oral Hygiene. Not brushing and flossing well enough or with enough frequency can lead to gum disease, which leads to bad breath. Halitosis can be a sign that plaque is present on your teeth.
  3. Food-Related Bad Breath. Food particles that aren't brushed or flossed away attract bacteria that leads to bad breath. It's especially important to brush after eating strong-smelling foods, such as garlic or onions.
  4. Smoking and Tobacco. Tobacco is bad for your health, and that includes your oral health. Smoking or chewing tobacco can contribute toward the development of gum disease, as well as oral cancer.
  5. Mouth Infections and Other Medical Problems. A mouth infection, sinus infection or even the common cold can cause you to temporarily have bad breath. Even conditions such as diabetes and reflux can cause halitosis. It's always wise to see our doctors to help determine the cause.

We are Your Ally

Even if you maintain good oral hygiene, it's important to see our doctors at our Green Bay office to deal with or avoid problems with bad breath. We can help you uncover the cause of halitosis, while also providing solutions that allow you to enjoy fresh breath without relying on mints and breath fresheners. As is the case with all things related to oral health, we are your number-one ally when it comes to eliminating the problem of bad breath.

What happens if I don’t have my wisdom teeth removed?

May 28th, 2024

One of the things our doctors and our team at Oak Grove Dentistry monitor during your dental appointments is the growth of your wisdom teeth, or third molars. Third molars generally begin to erupt between the ages of 17 and 25. Wisdom teeth may require removal for many reasons, including pain, infection, or growth issues. While not all patients need their wisdom tooth removed, problems can develop if removal is not performed.

Overcrowding

Many patients have smaller mouths and jaws, which do not allow room for the third molars to grow in properly. If these teeth do erupt, overcrowding can occur. Your teeth will begin to shift or overlap each other. Wisdom teeth that erupt after orthodontic care is completed can cause the teeth to shift and negate the work performed.

Impacted Wisdom Teeth

When wisdom teeth are impacted, they are trapped below your gum line. Impacted wisdom teeth can be very painful and may be prone to abscess and infection. The impaction can lead to decay and resorption of healthy teeth.

On occasion, if wisdom teeth are not monitored properly, their growth can shift parallel to the jaw line. They can also shift backward and eventually interfere with the opening and closing of your jaw.

Greater Potential for Decay

Even when wisdom teeth grow in properly, the location can make the teeth harder to care for. This in turn can lead to the growth of more bacteria, and create health issues later in life.

If you do not have your wisdom teeth removed, they will require continued monitoring. Wisdom teeth are just as subject to decay and other problems as the rest of your teeth. Those that appear above the gum surface can often be extracted at a dental office in a fashion similar to any other tooth extraction. Impacted teeth are normally handled by an oral surgeon.

Pain in the back of the jaw and swelling may indicated wisdom teeth that are beginning to rupture or are impacted. A simple set of X-rays will determine the extent and direction of growth. Please do not hesitate to discuss your concerns during your next visit our Green Bay office. We will be happy to explain wisdom teeth, and potential removal, as it applies to your specific case.